8 surprising facts about real Docker adoption

The datadog stats are out again. 🙂

Being the Ops in DevOps, I’m always interested in the container types (nginx and redis taking two thirds) and churn rates (1/2 day for orchestrated).

via 8 surprising facts about real Docker adoption

Advertisements
Quote | Posted on by | Leave a comment

How I Use Python Debugger to Fix Code – DZone Performance

Debugging is actually a fun thing to do, especially if you discover more and more efficient ways to do it. I’m going to show you how you can pimp your debugging skills.

A great short article on how to debug in python – using the debugger and not print statements. 🙂

via How I Use Python Debugger to Fix Code – DZone Performance

Quote | Posted on by | Leave a comment

How I Switched from Docker-Compose to Pure Ansible – Tomas Tomecek

The longer I used docker-compose, the more I realized it wasn’t meeting all of my needs. I needed a more powerful tool with full templating, more modules, easier setup and well-defined abstractions to better meet my needs. Ansible was that solution for me.

Interesting read on how Ansible makes it much easier…

via How I Switched from Docker-Compose to Pure Ansible

Quote | Posted on by | Leave a comment

Becoming open without turning into a mesmerized chicken | Opensource.com

Three years after immersion in open principles, a starry-eyed dreamer contemplates the limits of being a steward for organizational culture.

When you join an organization, they put your beak on the chalk line of their history, policies, and procedures, hoping to hypnotize you. MacKenzie’s advice is to remember that we all come into an organization with an “arcane potency” that allows us to contribute something wholly unique

 

A brilliant article for those lost in corporate environments looking for that enthusiasm they may have lost after years of red tape, policy and status quo.

via Becoming open without turning into a mesmerized chicken | Opensource.com

Quote | Posted on by | Leave a comment

Command-line Tools can be 235x Faster than your Hadoop Cluster | Adam Drake

this has illustrated some points about using and abusing tools like Hadoop for data processing tasks that can better be accomplished on a single machine with simple shell commands and tools. If you have a huge amount of data or really need distributed processing, then tools like Hadoop may be required, but more often than not these days I see Hadoop used where a traditional relational database or other solutions would be far better in terms of performance, cost of implementation, and ongoing maintenance.

After knocking up some perl to create some daily reports on multi-gig-sized logs files this is very interesting to see.  Initially ELK or Splunk were looked at – as they graph nicely.  But once i had my head around the data I could do what i wanted from the command line and then perl.

There are some good tips in here, I’m going to try out next time around.  Of course it will depend on the number of cores my VM has, if then it makes much difference.

via Command-line Tools can be 235x Faster than your Hadoop Cluster | Adam Drake

Quote | Posted on by | Leave a comment

The Root Cause Fallacy

If you really want to get to the root cause of a problem, you need to use the Five Whys approach. I rarely do that because I already know where it ends. The CEO or equivalent is always the problem. It’s turtles all the way down (or up). Saying that the CEO is ultimately responsible is true but useless. The CEO is ultimately responsible for everything.

That’s why the search for a root cause is usually a witch-hunt in disguise, trying to find someone or something to blame. If you think there is really a single cause, you eventually must identify a single person. If you stop short of that, everyone knows the process was a farce. But blaming a person is also a farce. Everyone knows that someone’s being thrown under the bus and that wasn’t the real problem.

Oh yes, been there a few times…

via The Root Cause Fallacy

Quote | Posted on by | Leave a comment

The Ultimate Career Choice: Generalist vs. Specialist – cleverism.com

With so many open source solutions out there becoming business critical.   How do you and your business cope, many solutions end up being a flash-in-the-pan, only good for a few short years before being replaced by the latest and greatest next ‘big’ thing.  So does specialism give way to generalism?

I, myself am a generalist.  I can go from automating Openstack with python on one day to exim, sendmail or postfix the next and then snmp monitoring, DNS or firewall changes the day after with a bit of MariaDB for kicks.  The depth of the work I can do in the software stack makes it interesting for me.  I suppose that is the great thing about 4th line support, never a dull moment or that daily grind that others have where it is just that same thing day after day..

So are you a specialist or a generalist?

Psst.  Can you do DevOps without generalists???

 

via The Ultimate Career Choice: Generalist vs. Specialist

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

USG – a USB device firewall

via Home · robertfisk/USG Wiki

Ed: just awesome 🙂

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

When Multitasking Is The Only Option – prof. beekums.

When Multitasking Is The Only Option

Multi-tasking doesn’t exist. All the science tells us that we are only capable of task switching. And task switching is really bad for us. Every time we switch tasks, we add to our cognitive load making us less effective at all the tasks we are attempting to do at once.

via When Multitasking Is The Only Option

Ed: I do what is suggested here.  Being in 4th line Ops, you never get a solid hour to yourself and being able to multitask effectively (even if you don’t want to) is something to get better at.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Analyzing Ansible runs using ARA

 

The Ansible Run Analysis tool integrates seamlessly with Ansible, offering a simple, intuitive way to find the data you need.

via Analyzing Ansible runs using ARA | Opensource.com

Looks very interesting…

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment