TaoSecurity: Why Do SOCs Look Like This?

hehe 🙂

via TaoSecurity: Why Do SOCs Look Like This?

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BBC Computer Literacy Project Archive

ian-mcnaught-davis

In the 1980s, the BBC explored the world of computing in The Computer Literacy Project. They commissioned a home computer (the BBC Micro) and taught viewers how to program.

The Computer Literacy Project chronicled a decade of information technology and was a milestone in the history of computing in Britain, helping to inspire a generation of coders.

This site contains all 146 of the original Computer Literacy Project programmes plus 121 related programmes, broken down into 2,509 categorised, searchable clips.

via BBC Computer Literacy Project Archive

Awesome.   Question is why aren’t they doing that now?  Seems like a good way to spend my TV licence fees…

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Creating an Oracle Database Vagrant Box – DZone Open Source

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Oracle recently launched a new GitHub repository for providing people with Oracle software inside Vagrant boxes. If you have ever set up an Oracle database inside a VirtualBox VM, whether it is as your sandbox environment, to explore Oracle database, or to use it as a full-on development environment, things have just gotten a lot easier for you. With Vagrant, you can now provision an Oracle database inside VirtualBox in a matter of a couple of simple steps.

Awesome !

via Creating an Oracle Database Vagrant Box – DZone Open Source

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What it Means to Eat the Frog – Noisli Blog

As Mark Twain once said “If it’s your job to eat a frog, it’s best to do it first thing in the morning. And if it’s your job to eat two frogs, it’s best to eat the biggest one first.”

The frog is that one thing you have on your to-do list that you have absolutely no motivation to do and that you’re most likely to procrastinate on. Eating the frog means to just do it, otherwise the frog will eat you meaning that you’ll end up procrastinating it the whole day.
Once that one task is done, the rest of the day will be an easier ride and you will get both momentum and a sense of accomplishment at the beginning of your day.

Back to work tomorrow after a lovely week off.  Now i need to find that frog and eat it. 🙂

via What it Means to Eat the Frog – Noisli Blog

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ELK Stack With Vagrant and Ansible – DZone Big Data

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For people looking for good examples of end to end Ansible, then there is a lot of goodness in this post.  But Ansible isn’t the be and end all, you still need to do other work in other areas to make it happen.  Just this this post shows.

Building full Infrastructure as Code isn’t easy.  It’s not hard either, but you have to think about a lot of things, and corral them into your code in a sensible way which is where it gets hard.  Otherwise you have a lot of loose ends than start to make things more difficult for you in the future when you want to expand or reuse your code/infrastructure.    Linking your apps, orchestrators and config management together in some sort of thoughtful reusable way is where you start to find things become harder, but after doing this a few times in new projects and realising that your previous attempts kinda sucked then doing that rework to change the code or any of the tools brings the experience you need to get it right more often than not.

Being from the Ops part of DevOps, I like these sorts of simple posts to show that it is possible for IaC to work, but it’s not a simple as you think if you’re coming from the Dev side of DevOps where one language is it on one platform or containerised app and your pre-built CI/CD/CD workflow.

via ELK Stack With Vagrant and Ansible – DZone Big Data

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8 surprising facts about real Docker adoption

The datadog stats are out again. 🙂

Being the Ops in DevOps, I’m always interested in the container types (nginx and redis taking two thirds) and churn rates (1/2 day for orchestrated).

via 8 surprising facts about real Docker adoption

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How I Use Python Debugger to Fix Code – DZone Performance

Debugging is actually a fun thing to do, especially if you discover more and more efficient ways to do it. I’m going to show you how you can pimp your debugging skills.

A great short article on how to debug in python – using the debugger and not print statements. 🙂

via How I Use Python Debugger to Fix Code – DZone Performance

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How I Switched from Docker-Compose to Pure Ansible – Tomas Tomecek

The longer I used docker-compose, the more I realized it wasn’t meeting all of my needs. I needed a more powerful tool with full templating, more modules, easier setup and well-defined abstractions to better meet my needs. Ansible was that solution for me.

Interesting read on how Ansible makes it much easier…

via How I Switched from Docker-Compose to Pure Ansible

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Becoming open without turning into a mesmerized chicken | Opensource.com

Three years after immersion in open principles, a starry-eyed dreamer contemplates the limits of being a steward for organizational culture.

When you join an organization, they put your beak on the chalk line of their history, policies, and procedures, hoping to hypnotize you. MacKenzie’s advice is to remember that we all come into an organization with an “arcane potency” that allows us to contribute something wholly unique

 

A brilliant article for those lost in corporate environments looking for that enthusiasm they may have lost after years of red tape, policy and status quo.

via Becoming open without turning into a mesmerized chicken | Opensource.com

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Command-line Tools can be 235x Faster than your Hadoop Cluster | Adam Drake

this has illustrated some points about using and abusing tools like Hadoop for data processing tasks that can better be accomplished on a single machine with simple shell commands and tools. If you have a huge amount of data or really need distributed processing, then tools like Hadoop may be required, but more often than not these days I see Hadoop used where a traditional relational database or other solutions would be far better in terms of performance, cost of implementation, and ongoing maintenance.

After knocking up some perl to create some daily reports on multi-gig-sized logs files this is very interesting to see.  Initially ELK or Splunk were looked at – as they graph nicely.  But once i had my head around the data I could do what i wanted from the command line and then perl.

There are some good tips in here, I’m going to try out next time around.  Of course it will depend on the number of cores my VM has, if then it makes much difference.

via Command-line Tools can be 235x Faster than your Hadoop Cluster | Adam Drake

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